You are currently viewing Front Knee Pain: Target It with This Essential Exercise

Front Knee Pain: Target It with This Essential Exercise

     For basketball players experiencing persistent pain at the front of the knee, relief may be closer than you think. In this blog post, we’ll explore a crucial exercise designed to reduce knee pain, enhance stability, and strengthen your knees. Whether you’re grappling with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome or Jumper’s Knee, the Three-Way Terminal Knee Extension Squat could be the solution you’ve been looking for. Let’s dive into the details of this versatile exercise.

Potential Sources of Knee Pain:

     Before we delve into the exercise, it’s essential to understand the common types of knee pain that basketball players often face. Patellofemoral pain and Jumper’s knee are the more common ones, with the former centering around the kneecap and the latter involving tendon problems around the knee joint. Here is a video explaining the differences in front of the knee pain:

The Three-Way Terminal Knee Extension Squat:

     To address front knee pain, incorporating the Three-Way Terminal Knee Extension Squat into your routine can be highly effective. This exercise not only targets patellofemoral pain but also addresses Jumper’s knee, making it a versatile and practical solution. All you need for this exercise is a strength band, and we’ll walk you through the setup and execution.

1. The Set-Up

  • Secure a thick strength band to a stable surface (squat rack, post, fence, etc.), creating a loop.
  • Face the stable surface and band
  • Step through the band and position the band behind your working knee

2. How to Perform

     You will have a stance leg, which is the leg where the band is pulling on, and you will be performing mini single leg squats on. Moreover, you will have a moving leg. Control the movements in three directions:

Forward

Start in a standing position with feet close together.
On the stance leg, you will allow the band to pull your knee forward.
On the moving leg, you will be reaching out as far forward as you can in control.
Once you reach the furthest point, you will squeeze your quad pushing back against the band to bring you back to the starting position.

To The Side / Lateral

Similar set-up and movement to going forward.
In this case, your moving leg will extend out to the side as far as possible under control.
Your stance leg will continue to track forward with controlling the band pulling you forward
Squeeze your quad and push against the band to return to the starting position

Behind / Reverse

Similar set-up and movement as the other movements.
In this case, your moving leg will extend out backwards as far as possible under control.
Your stance leg will continue to track forward with controlling the band pulling you forward.
Squeeze your quad and push against the band to return to the starting position.

3. Key Coaching Cues

  • Slow and controlled movements.
  • Keep the stance/working knee aligned with the second and third toe throughout the entire movement. Don’t let it collapse in or move excessively outward
  • Ensure a neutral trunk position, avoiding leaning to either side or arching your back.
  • Perform 2-3 Sets of 8-12 Reps Each Directions
  • WATCH THIS VIDEO TO SEE IT

Conclusion

     In conclusion, The Three-Way Terminal Knee Extension Squat is a valuable exercise for those dealing with pain at the front of the knee. This versatile exercise provides a safe and pain-free means of strengthening the knee joint, whether you’re dealing with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome or Jumper’s Knee. If you’re looking to elevate your game and alleviate knee discomfort, incorporating this exercise into your routine could be the game-changer you need.

The Basketball Doctors - Gabriel Ignacio Physical Therapist

Dr. Gabriel Ignacio PT, DPT, OCS, TPI

The Basketball Doctors - Marco Lopez Physical Therapist

Dr. Marco Lopez PT, DPT, CSCS

Medical Disclaimer:

The Basketball Doctors assume no responsibility or liability for any injury, loss, or damage incurred as a result of any use or reliance upon the information and material contained within or downloaded from its website. The Basketball Doctors are unable to provide any warranty concerning the accuracy or completeness of any information contained herein. The information provided in the videos are by no means complete or exhaustive, and, therefore, does not apply to all conditions, disorders, and health-related issues. The information is not intended to be physical therapy, medicaladvice, or treatment. Any reference to or mention of any particular diagnoses or dysfunctions is intended for informational purposes only and not an attempt to diagnose your particular problems.
     Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers before starting any new treatment or discontinuing an existing treatment. Talk with your healthcare provider about any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard your doctor’s medical advice or delay in seeking it as a result of something on this site. Reliance on any information provided by The Basketball Doctors is solely at your own risk.